Doing the best she can to raise happy, healthy children

Tag Archives: historical novel

Hello my friends! Sorry I’m posting a lot today. I’m trying to get caught and/or stay caught up on my posts. The last couple of weeks have been pretty busy. Today was a bit more relaxed which is why I was able to finish up a book. We also ran a few items to Good-will and played some video games. Overall, a pretty good day!

I finished reading The Tea Planter’s Wife today and here is my review.

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The Tea Planter’s Wife by Dinah Jefferies

Gwendolyn Hooper is a young, newly married woman who moved from London to Ceylon. Life in Ceylon is not at all what she expected. Her husband becomes distant, neighbors are difficult and the workers are resentful. She also quickly discovers her husband has a secret and he’s not willing to share it with her.

Jefferies does a great job of setting the stage and describing the environment of 1920’s Ceylon. She writes a rich story with themes of love, distrust, and prejudice. She tackled each of these topics while weaving a story with many twists and turns. This story does a good job of demonstrating how not being open with a spouse can lead to loss and poor decisions.

The cons of this story are a few. I had a hard time connecting with the main character. I found her immature and without much depth. In fact, I found many of the characters to be shallow. I believe the story would help flesh out the characters more. However, there were very little growth in the characters despite significant life circumstances. Her characters had wonderful opportunity to be fleshed out. I feel like the story would’ve been better if only one of the social issues/themes. This could provide more room to flesh out the character potentially. The lack of fleshed out characters and multitude of issues addressed in the book makes the book seem very long.

Overall I felt this book was just OK. Its not great, and probably wouldn’t come up in conversation for me to recommend.

On a scale of 1 to 5 bookends, I give this book a 3.

This book is not good for teenagers or younger as there are sexual scenes in the book. Although not completely explicit but they are written in the story.

Disclaimer: I received this book free from the publisher for an honest review.


It feels so great to be able to relax with a good book and to not have upcoming exams or assignments due. I can certainly get use to this! We took a road trip this weekend and I was able to read a whole book in less than two days. It was GLORIOUS!

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With you always by Jody Hedlund

Set in the 1850’s Hedlund tells the story of Elise Neuman and her sisters and Thorton Quincy. Elise Neuman and her sisters parents have died and are desperate for food and shelter. As a last resort Elise leaves her sisters in New York City and goes West to Illinois for work. Her goal is to send enough to New York to provide for her siblings and hopefully bring them to her. Thorton Quincy is a wealthy businessman’s son. He was given a challenge by his father in order to inherit the company. Desperate to gain his father’s approval and come out from under his brother’s shadow he begins the construction of an Illinois community.

This is a charming love story of two people from completely different worlds who find they have more in common than not. Hedlund provides just enough romance, heartache, and challenges to capture her audience. It is evident she researched this era and the backdrop of her story. I like the added information at the end of the book which provides additional information on the orphan trains. Her characters have depth and growth throughout the story. I enjoyed the depth she added to her secondary characters.

This book is a Christian novel. However, it is not filled with consistent Christian quotes or scriptures. There is mention of thanking God and general references to God. This is heavier toward the end, but not overwhelming. The book does clearly follow Christian themes such as kindness, charity, honesty, etc.

I look forward to additional Orphan Train stories.

I would recommend this book to those who enjoy historical romances and/or novels and Christian novels. I would recommend it to a young adult. The book does reference prostitution but only as a backdrop to the story. There is one instance of post attack, but no actual details were provided.

I give this book a 5 out of 5 bookends.

I did receive this book from the publisher as part of the blogging for books program in exchange for an honest review.


I’m taking a break from certification studying to review a couple of books. I graduated from Nurse Practitioner school two weeks ago. Since graduating, I’ve traveled every week and was able to get some reading done. Yaay! I also took some time off studying since one of the trips was to attend an intensive review for certification. I figured no reason focusing all my time studying until after that class. So, now, here I am studying since about 9 am this morning (its now almost 3PM) and I’m going get started on this review before leaving in to pick the kids up from school.

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The Chapel Car Bride by Judith Miller

Miller tells the story of Hope and her father as they live out of a train car and ministering to a mining town. He is a preacher and she assists with the music and children’s ministries. Miller also tells the story of a coal miner, Luke, and the mine owner’s son, Kirby. Hope and her father settle into life in Finch, West Virginia. Hope uses many opportunities to spread God’s word throughout the West Virginia countryside. Her trusting disposition has her trusting Kirby despite Luke’s cautions.

This story is a great Christian read. It was an easy and quick read. I think it took me only a little over a day to read. I felt several of the characters were fleshed out well. The character Kirby was nicely done. I felt I had him pegged pretty quickly and my opinion didn’t change much. Hope was the typical preacher’s daughter in the sense she was kind, naive and loved children. Luke seemed to have swaying emotions and also seemed pretty realistic. I’ll address him below.  I enjoyed reading about life on a rail car and life during prohibition. I also quite enjoyed reading about the inner conflict Luke had regarding his thoughts and anger toward the mining company and Kirby. These feelings are ones many Christians deal with daily and I like when authors address them in their writing. Finally, I really love the history the author adds into her books. In this case the chapel car, mining history, and prohibition.

Downfalls to the book, the first is a bit into the characters. I feel like it would’ve been nice to learn more about the preacher. He played a pivotal role in the story, yet there was little fleshing out of his character. Luke’s sister plays a relatively large role in the frustrating ending, but very little fleshing out occurred with her as well. I think adding just a bit to those characters could’ve really added to the story. This, however, didn’t ruin the story for me. Its just worth noting there more depth could’ve been added to the story.

A second down fall is the ending. I was a bit frustrated with the ending. The conflict was picking-up nicely and I was envisioning a BIG ending. And then, it was wrapped up nicely with a little bow and then the ending romance drug out for another couple of chapters. It wasn’t bad, but such a big change in where the story was going and how the characters were acting. It was a bit of a distraction and I would’ve appreciated a more direct route to happily ever after.

Over all, this was a good read! It was quick and enjoyable. It had Christian components in the story with the Christian premise. Very little scripture was quoted through out the story, but it had very obvious Christian themes.

I would recommend this story to any adult or young adult who enjoys historical novels, Christian reading, or just looking for a quick and light read.

I would give this book a 4 out of 5 bookends.

Disclaimer: I was provided a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.


Book Review: Dauntless by Dina L. Sleiman

Merry has become an enemy of the throne due to her father’s failed assassination attempt. Merry is skilled and bold and has taken on the task of caring for the village orphans. As with the classic Robin Hood tale, the group have been given a name: “the Ghosts of Farthingale Forest”.

Personally I love the Robin Hood story and was excited and nervous all at once to read a female version of my beloved story. I must say I was not disappointed!This was my first book from Sleiman. I found this one to be well-written and a quick read. The main character was a delightful woman who is capable and intelligent. I enjoyed reading a strong female character who was equally compassionate.

I truly enjoyed this novel. I recommend this book to any young adult who enjoy historical novels.

I give this book 5 out of 5 bookends.

I did receive this book from Bethany House Publishers as part of the blogging for books.


Book Review: Where Trust Lies by Janette Oke & Laurel Oke Logan

This is the second book in the Canadian West book series by Janette Oke and Laurel Oke Logan. Beth Thatcher has returned home from teaching in the Canadian West. Although she is ready to rest and relax her family has planned a lengthy trip. While on her trip, Beth discovers one of her family members trusted the wrong person.

As with the first book in the series, I truly enjoyed this book. This book is a wonderful follow-up story. This book did not take place in coal valley. I enjoyed reading about the different ports and the experience of cruising. I also enjoyed the love story between Beth and Jarrick.

This was a great read. I truly enjoyed it and would recommend it to anyone who enjoys historical novels.

I give this book a 5 out of 5 bookends.

I did receive this book for an honest review from Baker Publishing Group for the blogging for books program.